[vc_row fullwidth=”true” fullwidth_content=”false”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”439″ img_size=”full”][vc_single_image image=”451″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”454″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”452″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”455″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”457″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”459″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”460″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”464″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”462″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”466″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”468″ img_size=”medium”][vc_single_image image=”475″ img_size=”medium”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_custom_heading text=”Home made cornbread from home ground corn.”][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1541188287608{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]Pre-heat oven to 375 F

In a large bowl, mix 2 cups of cornmeal, 2 cups of flour, 1/2 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons baking powder, 2 teaspoons salt. Mix well.

Add 2 fresh eggs, 2 cups of milk, and a stick of butter. Mix well.

Pour mix into a buttered 3 quart glass cornbread dish and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Insert toothpick or knife into bread to check it is done.

Your oven time and temperature may vary to get the correct light brown color on top.

Electric and gas ovens seem to cook differently in terms of moisture

You can add some additional milk if the batter is too thick or the cornbread is too dry. The batter should thick but pour easily like a cake or pancake batter. Use a spatula to get every last drop from the mixing bowl into the oven dish.

We use a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer on a medium speed. Fresh eggs from free ranged chickens give a better color and texture to the mix. You can substitute your choice of cooking oil for the butter, but butter makes it taste better.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row disable_element=”yes”][vc_column][vc_hoverbox image=”451″ primary_title=”2 Cups home ground cornmeal” hover_title=”Home grown, dried, shucked, and ground into cornmeal is best”]You can buy clean, dried corn at your local farm supply in 50 pound bags. Watch you don’t get deer corn or other corn which has been chemically treated. Then grind to the size you prefer. We like it a little bit more on the coarse side, not as fine as flour though.

If all else fails, you can buy cornmeal from your local super market.

 

[/vc_hoverbox][mk_padding_divider][vc_hoverbox image=”452″ primary_title=”One Half Cup of pure cane sugar” hover_title=”C&H Pure Cane Sugar”]We prefer to use a pure cane sugar like C&H Pure Cane Sugar rather than the processed stuff from sugar beets or high fructose corn syrup both of which are known for being gmo.

[/vc_hoverbox][mk_padding_divider][vc_hoverbox image=”453″ primary_title=”Two Cups of Meadow Gold Bread Flour” hover_title=”Meadow Gold Bread Flour”]Home grown and ground whole wheat flour would likely be better tasting, but here we have to go to the super market and get what tastes best.

Maybe in the future we can grow and grind up our own wheat.

 

[/vc_hoverbox][mk_padding_divider][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Recommended Posts

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.